The current state of Ruby concurrency

Submitted by Christoph Olszowka 2012-03-27 07:31:27 UTC
Source:  http://boldr.net/current-state-ruby-concurrency

Referenced projects

Cramp

Cramp is a framework for developing asynchronous web applications.

Rubygem cramp

Total Downloads
52659
Releases
19
Current Version
0.15.3
Released
2014-04-29 00:00:00 UTC
First Release
2009-12-22 18:30:00 UTC
Depends on following gems
Depending Gems
5

Github lifo/cramp

Watchers
1552
Forks
128
Development activity
Less active
Last commit
2015-01-15 14:37:49 UTC

EventMachine

EventMachine implements a fast, single-threaded engine for arbitrary network communications. It's extremely easy to use in Ruby. EventMachine wraps all interactions with IP sockets, allowing programs to concentrate on the implementation of network protocols. It can be used to create both network servers and clients. To create a server or client, a Ruby program only needs to specify the IP address and port, and provide a Module that implements the communications protocol. Implementations of several standard network protocols are provided with the package, primarily to serve as examples. The real goal of EventMachine is to enable programs to easily interface with other programs using TCP/IP, especially if custom protocols are required.

Rubygem eventmachine

Total Downloads
18085929
Releases
38
Current Version
1.0.7
Released
2015-02-10 00:00:00 UTC
First Release
2006-04-13 04:00:00 UTC

Github eventmachine/eventmachine

Watchers
2923
Forks
469
Development activity
Less active
Last commit
2015-04-24 17:23:35 UTC

Celluloid

Celluloid enables people to build concurrent programs out of concurrent objects just as easily as they build sequential programs out of sequential objects

Rubygem celluloid

Total Downloads
7273065
Releases
49
Current Version
0.17.0.pre5
Released
2015-04-27 00:00:00 UTC
First Release
2011-05-11 06:00:00 UTC

Github celluloid/celluloid

Watchers
2589
Forks
192
Development activity
Less active
Last commit
2014-11-30 01:54:53 UTC
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