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A way to add context to the logs you have
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ContextualLogger Build Status Coverage Status Gem Version

This gem adds the ability to your ruby logger, to accept conditional context, and utilize it when formatting your log entry.

Dependencies

  • Ruby >= 2.6
  • ActiveSupport >= 4.2, < 7

Installation

To install this gem directly on your machine from rubygems, run the following:

gem install contextual_logger

To install this gem in your bundler project, add the following to your Gemfile:

gem 'contextual_logger', '~> 0.1'

To use an unreleased version, add it to your Gemfile for Bundler:

gem 'contextual_logger', git: 'git://github.com/Invoca/contextual_logger.git'

Usage

Initialization

To use the contextual logger, all you need to do is extend your existing logger instance:

require 'logger'
require 'contextual_logger'

contextual_logger = Logger.new(STDOUT)
contextual_logger.extend(ContextualLogger::LoggerMixin)

Or, include it into your own Logger class:

require 'logger'
require 'contextual_logger'

class ApplicationLogger < Logger
  include ContextualLogger::LoggerMixin
  ...
end

contextual_logger = ApplicationLogger.new(STDOUT)

Ways to Set Context

Context may be provided any of 3 ways. Typically, all 3 will be used together.

  • Globally for the process
    • For a block or period of time. These may be nested.
      • Inline when logging a message

Indentation above indicates nested precedence. The indented, inner level "inherits" the context from the enclosing, outer level. If the same key appears at multiple levels, the innermost level's value will take precedence.

Each of the 3 ways to set context is explained below, starting from the innermost (highest precedence).

Log Entries With Inline Context

All base logging methods (debug, info, warn etc) are available for use with optional inline context passed as a hash at the end:

contextual_logger.info('Service started', configured_options: config.inspect)

The block form with optional 'progname' is also supported. As with ::Logger, the block is only called if the log level is enabled.

contextual_logger.debug('progname', current_id: current_object.id) { "debug: #{expensive_debug_function}" }

Equally, the Logger#add may be passed an optional inline context at the end:

contextual_logger.add("INFO", 'progname', 'Service started', configured_options: config.inspect)

The block form of Logger#add is also supported:

contextual_logger.add("DEBUG", 'progname', file: __FILE__, current_object: inspect) { "debug: #{expensive_debug_function}" }

Applying Context Around a Block

If there is a set of context you'd like to apply to a block of code, simply wrap it in #with_context. These may be nested:

log_context = { file: __FILE__, current_object: inspect }
contextual_logger.with_context(log_context) do
  contextual_logger.info('Service started')

  invoice_log_context = { invoice_id: invoice.id }
  contextual_logger.with_context(invoice_log_context) do
    contextual_logger.info('About to process invoice')

    process(invoice)
  end
end

Applying Context Across Bracketing Methods

The above block-form is highly recommended, because you can't forget to reset the context. But sometimes you need to set the context for a period of time across bracketing methods that aren't set up to use in a block. You can manage the context reset yourself by not passing a block to with_context. In this case, it returns a context_handler object to you on which you must later call reset! to pop that context off the stack.

Consider for example the Test::Unit/minitest convention of setup and teardown methods that are guaranteed to be called before/after tests. The context could be set in setup and reset in teardown:

def setup
  log_context = { file: __FILE__, current_object: inspect }
  @log_context_handler = logger.with_context(log_context)
end

def teardown
  @log_context_handler&.reset!
end

Setting Process Global Context

If you'd like to set a global context for your process, you can do the following

contextual_logger.global_context = { service_name: 'test_service' }

Redaction

Registering a Secret

In order to register sensitive strings to the logger for redaction to occur, do the following:

password = "ffbba9b905c0a549b48f48894ad7aa9b7bd7c06c"
contextual_logger.register_secret(password)

contextual_logger.info("Request sent with body { 'username': 'test_user', 'password': 'ffbba9b905c0a549b48f48894ad7aa9b7bd7c06c' } }")

The above will produce the resulting log line:

03/10/20 12:22:05.769 INFO Request sent with body { 'username': 'test_user', 'password': '<redacted>' }

Overrides

ActiveSupport::TaggedLogging

ActiveSupport's TaggedLogging extension adds the ability for tags to be prepended onto logs in an easy to use way. This is a very powerful piece of functionality. If you're using this, there is an override you can use, to pull the tags into the context. All you need to do is add the following to your application's startup script:

require 'contextual_logger/overrides/active_support/tagged_logging/formatter'

Contributions

Contributions to this project are always welcome. Please thoroughly read our Contribution Guidelines before starting any work.