Project

escalate

0.08
The project is in a healthy, maintained state
A simple and lightweight gem to escalate rescued exceptions.
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016
2017
2018
2019
2020
2021
 Dependencies
 Project Readme

Escalate

A simple and lightweight gem to escalate rescued exceptions. This implementation is an abstract interface that can be used on it's own, or attached to more concrete implementations like Honeybadger, Airbrake, or Sentry in order to not just log exceptions in an easy to parse way, but also escalate the appropriate information to third party systems.

Installation

Add this line to your application's Gemfile:

gem 'escalate'

And then execute:

$ bundle install

Or install it yourself as:

$ gem install escalate

Usage

Adding Escalate to Your Gem

All you need to do is extend Escalate.mixin within your gem and you're all set.

module SomeGem
  include Escalate.mixin
end

Using .escalate

This will expose the Escalate#escalate method within your gem to be used instead of using logger.error.

module SomeGem
  include Escalate.mixin

  class << self
    attr_accessor :logger
  end

  class SomeClass
    def something_dangerous(key)
      # code here...
    rescue => exception
      SomeGem.escalate(exception,
                       "Exception raised in SomeGem::SomeClass#something_dangerous",
                       context: { key: key })
    end
  end
end

The following arguments are supported by .escalate:

argument default type description
exception Exception The exception to escalate.
location_message String A message providing information about where and why this exception is being escalated.
context: {} Hash An optional hash of context. This will be logged with the exception.

When SomeGem.escalate above is triggered, it will use the logger returned by SomeGem.logger or default to a STDERR logger and do the following:

  1. [optional] Log an error containing the exception, location_message, and context hash
  2. Trigger any on_escalate_callbacks configured on the Escalate gem

Step (1) is optional. It will happen if either of these is true:

  • by default if no on_escalate_callbacks have been registered; or
  • if any of the on_escalate_callbacks was registered with on_escalate(log_first: true).

Using .rescue_and_escalate

The above pattern of rescue with escalate is very common, so a single method is provided to do both. This is equivalent to the code above:

class SomeClass
  def something_dangerous(key)
    SomeGem.rescue_and_escalate("Exception raised in SomeGem::SomeClass#something_dangerous",
                                context: { key: key }) do
      # code here...
    end
  end
end

The following arguments are supported by .rescue_and_escalate:

argument default type description
location_message required String A message providing information about where and why this exception is being escalated.
context: {} Hash An optional hash of context. This will be logged with the exception.
exceptions: StandardError Class or Array(Class) The Class or Array(Class) to rescue. Class must be Exception or a sub-class.
pass_through_exceptions: [SystemExit, SystemStackError, NoMemoryError, SecurityError, SignalException] Class or Array(Class) The Class or Array(Class) to pass through without rescuing. Class must be Exception, or a sub-class. These take precedence over exceptions:.

Registering an Escalate Callback

If you are using an error reporting service, you can register an on_escalate callback to escalate exceptions. You have the option to handle logging yourself, or to let escalate log first, before yielding to callbacks.

The following arguments are supported by .on_escalate:

argument default type description
name: block.source_location String or Array Globally unique name for this callback.
log_first: true Boolean Whether escalate should log the error first. false means the block will take care of this.
&block required Proc The callback block to yield to from escalate.

Leave the Logging to the Escalate Gem

Here is an example that uses the default log_first: true so that logging is handled by the Escalate gem first:

Escalate.on_escalate do |exception, location_message, **context|
  # send exception, location_message, **context to the error reporting service here
end

Callback Uniqueness

Each callback may be named with the name: keyword argument. If a callback with the same name has been registered before, it will be overwritten with the new one.

Escalate.on_escalate(name: 'abc gem') do |exception, location_message, **context|
  # send exception, location_message, **context to the error reporting service here
end

If not given, the name: defaults to the .source_location property of the passed-in block.

Handle the Logging in the on_escalate Callback

Here is an example that handles logging itself with log_first: false:

Escalate.on_escalate(log_first: false) do |exception, location_message, **context|
  # log here first
  # send exception, location_message, **context to the error reporting service here
end

Development

After checking out the repo, run bin/setup to install dependencies. Then, run rake spec to run the tests. You can also run bin/console for an interactive prompt that will allow you to experiment.

To install this gem onto your local machine, run bundle exec rake install. To release a new version, update the version number in version.rb, and then run bundle exec rake release, which will create a git tag for the version, push git commits and the created tag, and push the .gem file to rubygems.org.

Contributing

Bug reports and pull requests are welcome on GitHub at https://github.com/invoca/escalate.