0.0
The project is in a healthy, maintained state
A low-dependency gem for parsing and writing packwerk YML files
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 Dependencies

Development

~> 2.2.16
>= 0
~> 3.0
>= 0

Runtime

 Project Readme

ParsePackwerk

This gem is meant to give a way to parse the various YML files that come with packwerk.

Usage

# Get all packages
# Note that currently, this does not respect configuration in `packwerk.yml`
packages = ParsePackwerk.all

# Get a single package with a given ame
package = ParsePackwerk.find('packs/my_pack')

# Get a structured `deprecated_references.yml` object a single package
deprecated_references = ParsePackwerk::DeprecatedReferences.for(package)

# Count violations of a particular type for a package
deprecated_references.violations.count(&:privacy?)
deprecated_references.violations.count(&:dependency?)

# Get the number of files a particular constant is violated in
deprecated_references.violations.select { |v| v.class_name == 'SomeConstant' }.sum { |v| v.files.count }

Why does this gem exist?

We generally recommend folks depend on packwerk rather than parse_packwerk. This gem is mostly a private implementation for other parts of the Big Rails modularization toolchain.

This gem exists for this toolchain for these reasons:

  • packwerk is lacking public APIs for the behavior we want. It's close with PackageSet, but we need to also be able to parse violations.
  • Certain critical, production runtime code-paths need to use this, and we want a simple, low-dependency, infrequently changing dependency for our production environment. One example of production usage is that package.yml files can store team ownership information, which is used when an error happens in production to route it to the right team.
  • packwerk has heavy duty dependencies like rails and lots of others, and it adds a degree of maintenance cost and complexity that isn’t necessary when all we want to do is read YML files

Long-term, it might make sense for these reasons to extract out some of the parsing from packwerk into a separate gem similar to this so that we can leverage the ecosystem of tools associated with the idea of a “pack” in ways that are simple and safe for both development and production environments.