0.06
A long-lived project that still receives updates
Power Types for Rails by Platanus
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 Dependencies

Development

~> 2.11
~> 0.10
~> 10.4
~> 3.1
= 0.66
~> 2.2.15

Runtime

 Project Readme

Power Types

Gem Version CircleCI Coverage Status

Rails pattern enforcing types used by the Platanus team.

Introduction

In Rails projects, Platanus encourages to use classes beyond models and controllers to hold the app's logic. These powerful types proposed are Services, Commands, Observers, Utils and Values.

For a deeper understanding about the usage of these patterns, feel welcome to read the related post in Platanus Blog (in spanish).

The goal aimed with this gem is to go further, and not just apply this patterns over POROs (plain simple ruby classes). The gem provides an special structure and syntax to create and run services, commands and more, with ease.

It also creates the directory for each type, and provides generators.

Installation

Add to your Gemfile:

gem "power-types"
bundle install

Power types

  • Power Types
    • Introduction
    • Installation
    • Power types
      • Services
      • Commands
      • Observers
      • Values
      • Presenters
      • Utils
    • Publishing
    • Contributing
    • Credits
    • License

Services

For generating services we use:

$ rails generate service MyService foo bar

This will create the MyService class, inheriting from a base service class:

class MyService < PowerTypes::Service.new(:foo, :bar)
  # Service code goes here
end

And its corresponding rspec file:

require 'rails_helper'

describe MyService do
  def build(*_args)
    described_class.new(*_args)
  end

  pending "describe what your service does here"
end

The arguments get available to be used in the service class as instance variables: @foo and @bar. Default values for arguments are optional, and can't be defined in the generator, but manually after like this:

class MyService < PowerTypes::Service.new(foo: "X", bar: nil)
  # Service code goes here
end

This is a way to make the argument optional. If no default value is assigned, the argument will be required, and an error raised if missing.

Now, suppose you have defined the following service:

class MagicMakingService < PowerTypes::Service.new(wizard: "Harry Potter")
  def gandalfize(who)
    "#{@wizard} gandalfized #{who}"
  end

  def harrypotterize(who)
    "#{@wizard} harrypotterized #{who}"
  end
end

Then, you can use it like this:

magic_service = MagicMakingService.new(wizard: "Gandalf")
magic_service.gandalfize("Sauron") #=> "Gandalf gandalfized Sauron"

magic_service = MagicMakingService.new
magic_service.harrypotterize("Voldemort") #=> "Harry Potter harrypotterize Voldemort"

Commands

For generating commands we use:

$ rails generate command ExecuteSomeAction foo bar

This will create the ExecuteSomeAction class, inheriting from a base command class:

class ExecuteSomeAction < PowerTypes::Command.new(:foo, :bar)
  def perform
    # Command code goes here
  end
end

And its corresponding rspec file:

require 'rails_helper'

describe ExecuteSomeAction do
  def perform(*_args)
    described_class.for(*_args)
  end

  pending "describe what perform does here"
end

The arguments get available to be used in the command class as instance variables: @foo and @bar. Default values for arguments are optional, and can't be defined in the generator, but manually after like this:

class ExecuteSomeAction < PowerTypes::Command.new(foo: "X", bar: nil)
  def perform
    # Command code goes here
  end
end

This is a way to make the argument optional. If no default value is assigned, the argument will be required, and an error raised if missing.

Now, suppose you have defined the following command:

class MakeMagicTrick < PowerTypes::Command.new(:wizard, receiver: "Sauron")
  def perform
    "#{@wizard} enchanted #{@receiver}"
  end
end

Then, you can use it like this:

MakeMagicTrick.for(wizard: "Gandalf") #=> "Gandalf enchanted Sauron"
MakeMagicTrick.for(wizard: "Harry Potter", receiver: "Voldemor") #=> "Harry Portter enchanted Voldemor"

In the case of commands, we are not supposed to store or reuse the object. You just want to run it and keep the result.

Observers

For generating observers we use:

$ rails generate observer MyModel

This will create the MyModelObserver class, inheriting from a base observer class:

class MyModelObserver < PowerTypes::Observer
  # after_save :run
  # before_create { puts "yes, you can provide a block to work with" }
  #
  # def run
  #   p object # object holds an MyModel instance.
  # end
end

It will also include the PowerTypes::Observable mixin in MyModel class:

class MyModel < ActiveRecord::Base
  include PowerTypes::Observable
end

And the corresponding rspec file:

require 'rails_helper'

describe MyModelObserver do
  pending "add some examples to (or delete) #{__FILE__}"
end

Now, suppose you have defined the following model (with name and villain attributes) and observer:

class Wizard < ActiveRecord::Base
  include PowerTypes::Observable
end
class WizardObserver < PowerTypes::Observer
  after_create :kill_villain

  def kill_villain
    p "#{object.name} has killed #{object.villain}"
  end
end

Then, you can use it like this:

Wizard.create!(name: "Gandalf", villain: "Sauron") #=> This action will trigger the method kill_villain defined in the WizardObserver's after_create callback.

As you can guess, object holds the Wizard instance.

You can trigger multiple methods on the same callback. For example:

class WizardObserver < PowerTypes::Observer
  after_create :kill_villain
  after_create :bury_villains_corpse

  def kill_villain
    p "#{object.name} has killed #{object.villain}"
  end

  def bury_villains_corpse
    p "#{object.name} has buried #{object.villain}'s corpse"
  end
end

Note: Triggering the event will preserve the order of the methods, so in the example kill_villain will be called before bury_villains_corpse.

Recently we added three new callbacks, after_create_commit, after_update_commit and after_save_commit. With these callbacks we want to reproduce the after_commit transactional callback from Active Record. For this implementation we use the gem After Commit Everywhere to be able to use the after_commit callbacks outside the Active Record models.

Values

This pattern doesn't have a generator.

Values are just simple Ruby classes, but watch out to keep them in the Values directory!

Presenters

For generating presenters we use:

$ rails generate presenter users_show

This will create the UsersShowPresenter class, inheriting from a base class:

class UsersShowPresenter < PowerTypes::PresenterBase
end

And its corresponding rspec file:

require 'rails_helper'

describe UsersShowPresenter do
  pending "add some examples to (or delete) #{__FILE__}"
end

To initialize a presenter inside your controller action you should execute the present_with method with valid params:

class UsersController < InheritedResources::Base
  def show
    presenter_params = { param1: 1, param2: 2 }
    @presenter = present_with(:users_show, presenter_params)
  end
end

You can access view helper methods through the h method:

class UsersShowPresenter < PowerTypes::PresenterBase
  def platanus_link
    h.link_to "Hi Platanus!", "https://platan.us"
  end
end

You can access presenter_params inside the presenter as an attr_reader

class UsersController < InheritedResources::Base
  def show
    presenter_params = { platanus_url: "https://platan.us" }
    @presenter = present_with(:users_show, presenter_params)
  end
end
class UsersShowPresenter < PowerTypes::PresenterBase
  def platanus_link
    h.link_to "Hi Platanus!", platanus_url
  end
end

If the presenter param has a decorator, the attr_reader will be decorated.

class UsersController < InheritedResources::Base
  def show
    presenter_params = { user: user }
    @presenter = present_with(:users_show, presenter_params)
  end

  private

  def user
    @user ||= User.find!(params[:id])
  end
end
class UserDecorator < Draper::Decorator
  delegate_all

  def cool_view_name
    "~º#{name}º~"
  end
end
class UsersShowPresenter < PowerTypes::PresenterBase
  def platanus_link
    h.link_to "Hi #{user.cool_view_name}!", platanus_url
  end
end

In the view, you can use it like this:

<div><%= @presenter.platanus_link %></div>

Utils

To generate a util we use:

$ bundle exec rails g util Numbers clean double

This will generate the NumbersUtil class in the app/utils directory, as follows:

class NumbersUtil < PowerTypes::BaseUtil

  def self.clean
    # Method code goes here
  end

  def self.double
    # Method code goes here
  end

end

And it will generate the spec file as well, in the spec/utils directory:

require 'rails_helper'

describe NumbersUtil do
  describe '#clean' do
    pending 'describe what the util method clean does here'
  end

  describe '#double' do
    pending 'describe what the util method double does here'
  end

end

Every util will inherit from the class PowerTypes::BaseUtil which raises an error when the initialize method is called. The purpose of this is to ensure that all the utils methods work as class methods. Thus, there is no need to create an instance of the util to use its methods. For instance, we could use the NumbersUtil as follows:

NumbersUtil.clean('5.000') # -> 5000
NumbersUtil.double(100) # -> 200

Publishing

On master/main branch...

  1. Change VERSION in lib/power-types/version.rb.
  2. Change Unreleased title to current version in CHANGELOG.md.
  3. Run bundle install.
  4. Commit new release. For example: Releasing v0.1.0.
  5. Create tag. For example: git tag v0.1.0.
  6. Push tag. For example: git push origin v0.1.0.

Contributing

  1. Fork it
  2. Create your feature branch (git checkout -b my-new-feature)
  3. Commit your changes (git commit -am 'Add some feature')
  4. Push to the branch (git push origin my-new-feature)
  5. Create new Pull Request

Credits

Thank you contributors!

Platanus

Power-Types is maintained by platanus.

License

Power Types is © 2016 Platanus, S.p.A. It is free software and may be redistributed under the terms specified in the LICENSE file.