Project

primalize

0.01
Low commit activity in last 3 years
Type-checked serializers for your Ruby objects
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016
2017
2018
2019
2020
2021
 Dependencies

Development

>= 0
~> 10.0
~> 3.0
 Project Readme

Primalize

Join the chat at https://gitter.im/jgaskins/primalize

Primalize lets you de-evolve your objects into primitive values for serialization. The primary use case is to serialize them into JSON, but once it's in its primitive state, it can be converted into other formats such as XML or CSV.

Primalizers support type checking by letting you specify the types of the resulting properties:

class OrderSerializer < Primalize::Single
  attributes(
    id: integer,
    customer_id: integer,
    product_ids: array(integer),
    status: enum(
      'requested',
      'payment_processed',
      'awaiting_shipment',
      'shipped',
      'delivered',
    ),
    signature_required: boolean,
    shipping_address: object(
      address1: string,
      address2: optional(string),
      city: string,
      state: string,
      zip: string,
    ),
    created_at: timestamp,
  )
end

OrderSerializer.new(order).call
# { id: ... }

You can also primalize a nested structure of response objects with Primalize::Many, replacing the type annotations with the classes of their respective serializers:

class PostResponseSerializer < Primalize::Many
  attributes(
    post: PostSerializer,
    author: UserSerializer,
    comments: enumerable(CommentSerializer), # Not just one comment, but *many*
  )
end

# Instantiate it by passing in the pertinent values
serializer = PostResponseSerializer.new(
  post: @post,
  author: @post.author,
  comments: @post.comments,
)

serializer.call
# {
#   post: { ... },
#   author: { ... },
#   comments: [
#     { ... },
#   ],
# }

Installation

Add this line to your application's Gemfile:

gem 'primalize'

And then execute:

$ bundle

Or install it yourself as:

$ gem install primalize

Usage

If you need to primalize a single object, you subclass Primalize::Single and specify the attributes and types of the result as in the example above.

Supported types

The complete list of supported types are:

  • integer: whole numbers
  • float: floating-point numbers
  • number: any numeric value
  • string: text
  • boolean: explicitly true or false (not "truthy" or "falsy" values)
  • array(*types): an array containing values of the specified types
    • Example: array(string, integer)
  • optional(*types): any of the specified types or nil
    • Example: optional(string), both "foo" and nil are acceptable values
  • enum(*values): must be one of the specified values
    • Example: enum('requested', 'shipped', 'delivered')
  • timestamp: a Date, Time, or DateTime value
  • any(*types): any value of the given types
    • Example: any(string, integer) will only match on strings and integers
    • If no types are specified, any value will match
  • primalize(YourPrimalizerClass): primalizes the specified attribute with the given Primalize::Single subclass
    • Example: primalize(OrderSerializer)
  • object(**types): a hash of the specified structure
    • Example: object(id: integer, name: string)
    • Only the required keys need to be specified. The rest of the hash will pass.
    • If no keys are specified, all of them are optional and it will match any hash.

Attribute coercion

Reducing the object's attributes to a hash isn't all you do in most apps. You may also need to do some coercion. For example, if you have an object whose city isn't stored as a string but you need to translate it to one:

class ShipmentSerializer < Primalize::Single
  attributes(
    city: string { |city| city.name },
    # ...
  )
end

Virtual attributes

You can also generate attributes that don't exist on the object being primalized by defining methods on the primalizer:

class ShipmentSerializer < Primalize::Single
  attributes(
    payment_method: string,
  )

  def payment_method
    if object.paid_with_card?
      'credit_card'
    elsif object.purchase_order?
      'purchase_order'
    elsif object.bill_later?
      'invoice'
    else
      'unknown'
    end
  end
end

Type Checking

By default, subclasses of Primalize::Single will raise an ArgumentError if there is a mismatch between the types declared in its attributes call and what is passed in to be primalized. In production, you might not want that to happen, so you can change that in your production config:

Primalize::Single.type_mismatch_handler = proc do |primalizer, attr, type, value|
  msg = "Type mismatch: #{primalizer.name}##{attr} is expected to be #{type.inspect}, but is a #{value.inspect}\n"
  msg << caller.grep(Regexp.new(Rails.root)).join("\n") # Include application stack trace

  Slack.notify '#bugs', msg
end

Development

After checking out the repo, run bin/setup to install dependencies. Then, run rake spec to run the tests. You can also run bin/console for an interactive prompt that will allow you to experiment.

To install this gem onto your local machine, run bundle exec rake install. To release a new version, update the version number in version.rb, and then run bundle exec rake release, which will create a git tag for the version, push git commits and tags, and push the .gem file to rubygems.org.

Contributing

Bug reports and pull requests are welcome on GitHub at https://github.com/jgaskins/primalize. This project is intended to be a safe, welcoming space for collaboration, and contributors are expected to adhere to the Contributor Covenant code of conduct.

License

The gem is available as open source under the terms of the MIT License.

Code of Conduct

Everyone interacting in the Primalize project’s codebases, issue trackers, chat rooms and mailing lists is expected to follow the code of conduct.