0.06
A long-lived project that still receives updates
A simple RocksDB library for Ruby
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 Dependencies

Development

~> 2.0
~> 12.0
~> 3.0
 Project Readme

Build Status Gem Version

RocksDB

The rocksdb is a persistent in-process key-value store.

Read more about it here: http://rocksdb.org/

This gem contains Ruby bindings so that you can use it from your Ruby process.

Installation

First, install rocksdb: https://github.com/facebook/rocksdb/blob/master/INSTALL.md

Add this line to your application's Gemfile:

gem 'rocksdb-ruby'

And then execute:

$ bundle

Or install it yourself as:

$ gem install rocksdb-ruby

rocksdb-ruby is tested against Ruby 2.4, 2.5 and 2.6 on Linux and macOS platforms. However, it might work on other platforms.

rocksdb-ruby supports rocksb 4.5.1 and later. It is tested against master branch with all supported ruby version. It is also tested against few specific version, available in popular distributions. Check .travis.yml for details.

JRuby, TruffleRuby and Rubinius are not supported at the moment.

Usage

Open database

First, you need to open database. Use open method and pass path to database root as first argument. By default, it will create path if missing.

    require "rocksdb"

    # Open for reads and writes
    rocksdb = RocksDB.open "/tmp/file1"

You can pass RocksDB options as second argument:

    require "rocksdb"

    # Open for reads and writes
    rocksdb = RocksDB.open "/tmp/file2", compression: "kNoCompression"

Or you can pass raw Option String:

    require "rocksdb"

    # Open for reads and writes
    rocksdb = RocksDB.open "/tmp/file2", "compression=kNoCompression"

Read more about Option Sting: https://github.com/facebook/rocksdb/wiki/Option-String-and-Option-Map#option-string

Basic reads and writes

You can read and write keys using put and get methods:

    require "rocksdb"

    # Open for reads and writes
    rocksdb = RocksDB.open "/tmp/file3"

    # Store string `World` under key `Hello`
    rocksdb.put "Hello", "World"

    # Read a value stored under key `Hello`
    puts rocksdb.get "Hello"
    # => World

You can also use Hash-like methods [] and []=

    require "rocksdb"

    # Open for reads and writes
    rocksdb = RocksDB.open "/tmp/file4"

    # Store string `World` under key `Hello`
    rocksdb["Hello"] = "World"

    # Read a value stored under key `Hello`
    puts rocksdb["Hello"]
    # => World

If key does not exists, RocksDB will return nil:

    require "rocksdb"

    # Open for reads and writes
    rocksdb = RocksDB.open "/tmp/file5"

    # Try to read a key, that does not exists
    result = rocksdb.get "Missing Key"

    if !result
      puts "Key not found!"
    end

    # => Key not found

If you want to get multiple keys at the same time, you can use get with multiple arguments:

    require "rocksdb"

    # Open for reads and writes
    rocksdb = RocksDB.open "/tmp/file6"

    rocksdb.put "First Key", "First Value"
    rocksdb.put "Second Key", "Second Value"
    rocksdb.put "Third Key", "Third Value"

    # If key does not exists, you'll get nil
    values = rocksdb.get "Second Key", "Imaginary Key", "Third Key"

    puts values
    # => ["Second Value", nil, "Third Value"]

You can check, if key exists:

    require "rocksdb"

    # Open for reads and writes
    rocksdb = RocksDB.open "/tmp/file7"

    rocksdb.put "Real Key", "Real Value"

    rocksdb.exists? "Real Key"
    # => true

    rocksdb.exists? "Imaginary Key"
    # => false

exists? method returns result of KeyMayExist.

If you need more infomation about KeyMayExist, see rockdb source comments.

And you can delete keys, when not needed:

    require "rocksdb"

    # Open for reads and writes
    rocksdb = RocksDB.open "/tmp/file8"

    rocksdb.put "Delete Me", "Memory"
    rocksdb.exists? "Delete Me"
    # => true
    rocksdb.delete "Delete Me"
    rocksdb.exists? "Delete Me"
    # => false

    rocksdb.get "Delete Me"
    # => nil

You can open RocksDB only for reading:

    require "rocksdb"

    # Open only for reading
    rocksdb = RocksDB.open_readonly "/tmp/file9"

    puts rocksdb.writable?
    # => false

    rocksdb.put "First Key", "First Value"

    # => RocksDB::ReadOnly (database is read-only)

Enumerable

You can enumerate over all values using each method. Note how values are sorted lexicographically by their keys:

    require "rocksdb"

    # Open for reads and writes
    rocksdb = RocksDB.open "/tmp/file10"

    rocksdb.put "One", "1"
    rocksdb.put "Two", "2"
    rocksdb.put "Three", "3"

    rocksdb.each do |value|
      puts value
    end

    # => 1
    # => 3
    # => 2

Additionally, you can enumerate in reverse order with reverse_each:

    require "rocksdb"

    # Open for reads and writes
    rocksdb = RocksDB.open "/tmp/file11"

    rocksdb.put "One", "1"
    rocksdb.put "Two", "2"
    rocksdb.put "Three", "3"

    rocksdb.reverse_each do |value|
      puts value
    end

    # => 2
    # => 3
    # => 1

You can enumerate over keys with each_key or in reverse order with reverse_each_key:

    require "rocksdb"

    # Open for reads and writes
    rocksdb = RocksDB.open "/tmp/file12"

    rocksdb.put "One", "1"
    rocksdb.put "Two", "2"
    rocksdb.put "Three", "3"

    rocksdb.each_key do |key|
      puts key
    end

    # => One
    # => Three
    # => Two

    rocksdb.reverse_each_key do |key|
      puts key
    end

    # => Two
    # => Three
    # => One

You can enumerate over both keys and values with each_pair and in reverse order with reverse_each_pair:

    require "rocksdb"

    # Open for reads and writes
    rocksdb = RocksDB.open "/tmp/file13"

    rocksdb.put "One", "1"
    rocksdb.put "Two", "2"
    rocksdb.put "Three", "3"

    rocksdb.each_pair do |key, value|
      puts "#{key} = #{value}"
    end

    # => One = 1
    # => Three = 3
    # => Two = 2

Additionally, you can enumerate over keys that start with a specific prefix with each_prefix:

    require "rocksdb"

    # Open for reads and writes
    rocksdb = RocksDB.open "/tmp/file14"

    rocksdb.put "my:1", "1"
    rocksdb.put "my:2", "2"
    rocksdb.put "your:3", "3"

    rocksdb.each_prefix("my") do |key, value|
      puts "#{key} = #{value}"
    end

    # => my:1 = 1
    # => my:2 = 2

Or you can scan over the ranges of keys with each_range. Note, range is [start, limit]:

    require "rocksdb"

    # Open for reads and writes
    rocksdb = RocksDB.open "/tmp/file15"

    10.times do |count|
      rocksdb.put "key:#{count}", "#{count}"
    end

    rocksdb.each_range("key:5", "key:7") do |key, value|
      puts "#{key} = #{value}"
    end

    # => key:5 = 5
    # => key:6 = 6
    # => key:7 = 7

Atomic Batches

You can use RocksDB::Batch to atomically insert big chunks of data.

    require "rocksdb"

    # Open for reads and writes
    rocksdb = RocksDB.open "/tmp/file16"

    batch = RocksDB::Batch.new

    batch.delete("test:batch1")
    batch.put("test:batch2", "b")

    rocksdb.write(batch)

    rocksdb.each_pair do |key, value|
      puts "#{key} = #{value}"
    end

    # => test:batch2 = b

Read more about RocksDB batches: https://github.com/facebook/rocksdb/wiki/Basic-Operations#atomic-updates

Iterator

You can get RocksDB Iterator with to_iterator method to iterate over your data:

    require "rocksdb"

    # Open for reads and writes
    rocksdb = RocksDB.open "/tmp/file16"

    10.times do |count|
      rocksdb.put "key:#{count}", "#{count}"
    end

    # Get Iterator
    iterator = rocksdb.to_iterator
    # Seek to some position. You can also use seek("key") to
    iterator.seek_to_first

    while iterator.valid?
      puts "#{iterator.value} = #{iterator.key}"
      iterator.next
    end

    iterator.close

Supported methods:

  • seek(key) seeks to closest key to given prefix at beginning
  • seek_to_first seeks to the first key
  • seek_to_last seeks to the last key
  • next seeks to the next key
  • previous seeks to the previous key
  • valid? returns true if iterator can be iterated
  • close closes iterator
  • key returns current key
  • value returns current value

Methods supported by rocksdb 4.11 and later:

  • seek_for_previous(key)seeks to closest key to given prefix at end

Upgrade

When upgrading from 0.2 version, please note the following breaking changes:

  • multi_get will return nil instead of empty string
  • RocksDB::DB.get_instance is removed. Implement your own DB instance cache if needed
  • each_ methods now returns Enumerator instead of RocksDB::Iterator

Also, there some things that are now deprecated and will be removed in future versions:

  • RocksDB::DBError was deprecated and replaced with RocksDB::Error. Specific errors now have their own exception class: ReadOnly, DatabaseClosed, IteratorClosed, StatusError
  • is_open? was replaced with open?
  • is_readonly? was replaced with writable?
  • multi_get was replaced with get_many
  • new_iterator was replaced with to_iterator
  • Iterator#valid was replaced with Iterator#valid?

Contributing

  1. Fork it
  2. Create your feature branch (git checkout -b my-new-feature)
  3. Commit your changes (git commit -am 'Add some feature')
  4. Push to the branch (git push origin my-new-feature)
  5. Create new Pull Request