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A standardized structure for request specs in Rails.
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RSpec::DeclarativeRequests

A standardized structure for request specs in Rails.

require 'rails_helper'

RSpec.describe 'GET /widgets/:id' do
  let(:id) { FactoryBot.create(:widget).id }
  it { is_expected.to have_http_status(:ok) }
end

# fancier
RSpec.describe 'GET /widgets/:widget#id' do
  let(:widget) { FactoryBot.create(:widget) }

  it "responds with the widget" do
    is_expected.to have_attributes(
      status: 200,
      content_type: 'application/json',
      body: be_json( # `be_json` sold separately (from `saharspec` or `rspec-composable_json_matchers`)
        widget: {
          id: 7,
          name: 'Kevin',
        }
      )
    )
  end
end

Setup

Add to your Gemfile (probably in the :test group):

# Gemfile
group :test do
  gem 'rspec-declarative_requests'
end

Include it in your RSpec config:

# spec/rails_helper.rb
RSpec.configure do |config|
  # enabled for ALL request specs
  config.include RSpec::DeclarativeRequests, type: :request

  # OR: enable only for request specs tagged as :declarative
  config.include RSpec::DeclarativeRequests, type: :request, declarative: true
end

Or include it straight into the spec:

# spec/requests/whatever_spec.rb
require 'rails_helper'

RSpec.describe 'Whatever' do
  include RSpec::DeclarativeRequests

  describe 'GET /whatevers' do
    # ...
  end
end

Using subject

This gem sets the RSpec subject to the response, after making the request. This allows you do use is_expected or expect(subject) to check the response.

describe 'GET /thing' do
  it { is_expected.to be_ok }

  # OR

  it "responds with 200 OK" do
    expect(subject).to be_ok
  end
end

Using params

There is a let for request params that starts as an empty Hash. You can either override it:

let(:params) do
  { my_param: 123 }
end

Or you can modify it in a before block:

before do
  params[:my_param] = 123
end

Using before blocks, you can do nested contexts:

context 'with a user' do
  before { params[:user] = { id: 123 } }

  context 'who is cool' do
    before { params[:user][:is_cool] = true }
    # ...
  end

  context 'who is not cool' do
    before { params[:user][:is_cool] = false }
    # ...
  end
end

Using headers

There is a let for request headers that starts as an empty Hash. This works exactly the same as params described above.

context 'requesting JSON' do
  before { headers['Accepts'] = 'application/json' }
  # ...
end

Path Interpolation

The path in the request description behaves kind of like a Rails route. Named segments that start with a : will be replaced by the value of the let (or method) with the same name.

describe 'POST /things/:thing_id' do
  let(:thing_id) { 4444 }
  # ...
end

It's common to want to use an attribute of an object that you already have a let for. To do that, use the # character.

describe 'POST /things/:thing#id' do
  let(:thing) { FactoryBot.create(:thing) }
  # ...
end

Attributes can be chained together.

describe 'POST /things/:user#things#first#id' do
  let(:user) { FactoryBot.create(:user, :with_things) }
  # ...
end

Hashs can also be interpolated by their keys, which can be either strings or symbols.

describe 'POST /things/:user#things#first#id' do
  let(:user) do
    {
      things: [
        { id: 1 },
        { id: 2 },
      ]
    }
  end

  #...
end

License

This gem is available as open source under the terms of the MIT License.