0.07
Low commit activity in last 3 years
A long-lived project that still receives updates
Provides a module insertion protocol to facilitate adding features to ActiveRecord
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016
2017
2018
2019
2020
2021
2022
 Dependencies

Development

~> 13.0
~> 3.0
~> 4.2.0

Runtime

~> 1.0.2
 Project Readme

Gem Version Build Status Coverage Status

SchemaMonkey

SchemaMonkey is a behind-the-scenes gem to make it easy to write extensions to ActiveRecord. It provides:

  • A simple convention-based mechanism to insert modules into ActiveRecord modules.
  • A simple convention-based mechanism to create and use Modware middleware stacks.

SchemaMonkey by itself doesn't add any behavior -- SchemaMonkey is intended to make it easy to add clients that define methods and stacks, that are then available to other clients or the app. (In particular, most clients of SchemaMonkey will depend on schema_plus_core, which is a SchemaMonkey client that provides an "internal extension API" to ActiveRecord.)

Installation

As usual:

gem "schema_monkey"                 # in a Gemfile
gem.add_dependency "schema_monkey"  # in a .gemspec

Usage

SchemaMonkey works with the notion of a "client" -- which is a module containining definitions. A typical SchemaMonkey client looks like

require 'schema_monkey'
require 'other-client1'   # make sure clients you depend on are registered
require 'other-client2'   # first, if/as needed.

module MyClient

  module ActiveRecord
    #
    # active record extensions, if any
    #
  end

  module Middleware
    #
    # middleware stack modules, if any
    #
  end

end

SchemaMonkey.register MyClient     # <--- That's it!  No configuration needed

of course a typical client will be split into files corresponding to submodules; e.g. here's the top level of schema_plus_indexes:

require 'schema_plus/core'

require 'schema_plus/indexes/active_record/base'
require 'schema_plus/indexes/active_record/connection_adapters/abstract_adapter'
require 'schema_plus/indexes/active_record/connection_adapters/index_definition'

require 'schema_plus/indexes/middleware/dumper'
require 'schema_plus/indexes/middleware/migration'
require 'schema_plus/indexes/middleware/model'
require 'schema_plus/indexes/middleware/schema'

SchemaMonkey.register SchemaPlus::Indexes

The details of ActiveRecord exentions and Middleware modules are described below.

ActiveRecord Extensions

Here's a simple example of an extension to ActiveRecord:

require 'schema_monkey'

module PracticalJoker
  module ActiveRecord
    module Base

       def save(*args)
         raise "April Fools!" if Time.now.yday == 91
         super
       end

       module ClassMethods
         def columns
           raise "Boo!" if Time.now.yday == 304
           super
         end
       end

      end
    end
  end
end

SchemaMonkey.register PracticalJoker

SchemaMonkey inserts each submodule of MyClient::ActiveRecord into the corresponding module of ActiveRecord, with ClassMethods inserted as class methods.

This works for arbitrary submodule paths, such as MyClient::ActiveRecord::ConnectionAdapters::TableDefinition. SchemaMonkey will raise an error if the client defines a module that does not have a corresponding ActiveRecord module.

Notice that insertion is done using Module.prepend, so that client modules can override existing methods and use super.

DBMS-specific insertion

If a client module's name includes one the dbms names Mysql, PostgreSQL or SQLite3 (case insensitive), the insertion will only be performed if that's the dbms in use. So, e.g. MyClient::ActiveRecord::ConnectionAdapters::PostgreSQLAdapter will only be inserted if the app is using PostgreSQL.

Additionally, for ActiveRecord modules that are not inherently dbms-specific, you can use one of the dbms names (case insensitive) as a component in the client module's path to do dbms-specific insertion. E.g.

module MyClient
  module ActiveRecord
    module ConnectionAdapters
      module Sqlite3
        module TableDefinition
          #
          # SQLite3-specific enhancements to
          # ActiveRecord::ConnectionAdapters::TableDefinition
          #
        end
      end
    end
  end
end

The dbms name component can be anywhere in the module path after MyClient::ActiveRecord

insert vs prepend

  • By default, SchemaMonkey inserts a client module using prepend, and a client ClassMethods module using singleton_class.prepend. This allows overriding existing methods and using super. On insertion, Ruby will of course call the module's self.prepended method, if one is defined.

  • However, if the client module defines a module method self.included then SchemaMonkey will use include for a module and singleton_class.include for a ClassMethods module -- and Ruby will of course call that method.

Note that in the case of a ClassMethods module, when Ruby calls self.prepended or self.included, it will pass the singleton class. For convience SchemaMonkey will also call self.extended if defined, passing it the ActiveRecord module itself, just as Ruby would if extend were used.

Middleware Modules

SchemaMonkey provides a convention-based front end to using modware middleware stacks.

SchemaMonkey uses Ruby modules to organize the stacks: Each stack is contained in a submodule of SchemaMonkey::Middleware

Defining a stack

Here's an example of defining a middleware stack:

module MyClient
  module Middleware
    module Index
      module Exists
        Env = [:connection, :table_name, :column_name, :options, :result]
      end
    end
  end
end

This defines a stack available at SchemaMonkey::Middleware::Index::Exists. You can use any module path you want for organizational convenience. The const Env signals to SchemaMonkey to create a stack at that location; the environment object for the stack will have the listed fields. (Env actually can be an array of symbols or a Class, as per Modware::Stack.new.)

SchemaMonkey will raise an error if a stack had already been defined there.

The defined stack module has a module method start that delegates to Modware::Stack.start. Here's an example of using the above stack as a wrapper around ActiveRecord's index_exists? method:

module MyClient
  module ActiveRecord
    module ConnectionAdapters
      module SchemaStatements

        def index_exists?(table_name, column_name, options = {})
          SchemaMonkey::Middleware::Index::Exists.start(connection: self, table_name: table_name, column_name: column_name, options: options) { |env|
            env.result = super env.table_name, env.column_name, env.options
          }.result
        end

      end
    end
  end
end

This is a fairly typical idiom for wrapping behavior in a stack:

  1. Pass self and the method arguments to the stack environment
  2. Call the base implementation, passing it argument values from the environment (giving clients a chance to modify them in before or around methods)
  3. Place the result in the environment (giving clients a chance to modify it in after or around methods
  4. start returns the environment object -- the method returns the result that's stored in the environment

Inserting Middleware in a stack

If an earlier client defined a stack, a later client can insert middleware into the stack:

require 'my_client' # earlier client defines the stack

module UColumnImpliesUnique
  module Middlware
    module Index
      module Exists
        def before(env)
          env.options.reverse_merge!(unique: env.column_name.start_with? 'u')
        end
      end
    end
  end
end

SchemaMonkey.register(UColumnImpliesUnique)

SchemaMonkey uses the module MyLaterClient::Middleware::Index::Exists as modware middleware for the corresponding stack. The middleware module can define middleware methods before, around, after, or implement as per modware

Note that the distinguishing feature between defining and using a stack is whether Env is defined.

Compatibility

SchemaMonkey is tested on:

  • ruby 2.5 with activerecord 5.2, using mysql2, sqlite3 or postgresql:9.6
  • ruby 2.5 with activerecord 6.0, using mysql2, sqlite3 or postgresql:9.6
  • ruby 2.5 with activerecord 6.1, using mysql2, sqlite3 or postgresql:9.6
  • ruby 2.7 with activerecord 5.2, using mysql2, sqlite3 or postgresql:9.6
  • ruby 2.7 with activerecord 6.0, using mysql2, sqlite3 or postgresql:9.6
  • ruby 2.7 with activerecord 6.1, using mysql2, sqlite3 or postgresql:9.6
  • ruby 2.7 with activerecord 7.0, using mysql2, sqlite3 or postgresql:9.6
  • ruby 3.0 with activerecord 6.0, using mysql2, sqlite3 or postgresql:9.6
  • ruby 3.0 with activerecord 6.1, using mysql2, sqlite3 or postgresql:9.6
  • ruby 3.0 with activerecord 7.0, using mysql2, sqlite3 or postgresql:9.6
  • ruby 3.1 with activerecord 6.0, using mysql2, sqlite3 or postgresql:9.6
  • ruby 3.1 with activerecord 6.1, using mysql2, sqlite3 or postgresql:9.6
  • ruby 3.1 with activerecord 7.0, using mysql2, sqlite3 or postgresql:9.6

Release Notes

  • 3.0.2 -- Add AR 7.0 and Ruby 3.1
  • 3.0.1 -- Use modware 1.0.1
  • 3.0.0 -- updated to support ruby 2.5+ only and rails 5.2 through 6.1
  • 2.1.6 -- stricter dependency on modware
  • 2.1.5 -- Remove dependency on its-it :( #12
  • 2.1.4 -- Loosen dependency to allow AR 5.0, and include it in the test matrix
  • 2.1.3 -- Guard against multiple insertion of modules.
  • 2.1.2 -- Insert self earlier; don't wait for connection adapter to be instantiated. Fixes #6 re db:schema:load
  • 2.1.1 -- Bug fix: don't choke if a module contains a BasicObject const
  • 2.1.0 -- First version to support all of schema_plus's needs for the 1.8.7 -> 2.0 upgrade

Development & Testing

Are you interested in contributing to schema_monkey? Thanks! Please follow the standard protocol: fork, feature branch, develop, push, and issue pull request.

Some things to know about to help you develop and test:

  • schema_dev: SchemaMonkey uses schema_dev to facilitate running rspec tests on the matrix of ruby, activerecord, and database versions that the gem supports, both locally and on github actions

    To to run rspec locally on the full matrix, do:

      $ schema_dev bundle install
      $ schema_dev rspec
    

    You can also run on just one configuration at a time; For info, see schema_dev --help or the schema_dev README.

    The matrix of configurations is specified in schema_dev.yml in the project root.