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A minimal service object composer with support for individual commands and top level organizer objects
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 Project Readme

SimpleService

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SimpleService facilitates the creation of Ruby service objects into highly discreet, reusable, and composable units of business logic. The core concept of SimpleService is the definition of "Command" objects/methods. Commands are very small classes or methods that perform exactly one task. When properly designed, these command objects can be composited together or even nested to create complex flows.

2.0.0 update notes

This update is a major refactor from previous 1.x.x versions. After revisiting this codebase I decided that I needed to make SimpleService actually simple in both use and implementation. The gem has now been paired down to about 150 lines of code.

  • All functionality is added to your service class via module inclusion instead of inheritance
  • The concept of an Organizer has been removed
  • The DSL for defining interfaces has been removed in favor of simple keyword arguments
  • #success or #failure must be called within each command or call method
  • Services are always invoked via the class method .call. Previously you could use either #call or .call.

Installation

Add this line to your application's Gemfile:

gem 'simple_service'

And then execute:

$ bundle

Or install it yourself as:

$ gem install simple_service

Setup and Basic Usage:

  • load the gem
  • include the SimpleService module into your service object class
  • define one or more comamnds that it will perform, must accept either keyword arguments or a hash argument
  • call #success or #failure with any values you wish to pass along to the next command (or wish to return if it is the last command)
require 'rubygems'
require 'simple_service'

class DoStuff
  include SimpleService

  commands :do_something_important, :do_another_important_thing

  def do_something_important(name:)
    message = "hey #{name}"

    success(message: message)
  end

  def do_another_important_thing(message:)
    new_message = "#{message}, we are doing something important!"

    success(the_final_result: new_message)
  end
end

result = DoStuff.call(name: 'Alice')
result.success? #=> true
result.value #=> {:the_final_result=>"hey Alice, we are doing something important!"}

A failure:

require 'rubygems'
require 'simple_service'

class DoFailingStuff
  include SimpleService

  commands :fail_at_something

  def fail_at_something(name:)
    message = "hey #{name}, things went wrong."

    failure(message: message)
  end
end

result = DoStuff.call(name: 'Bob')
result.success? #=> false
result.failure? #=> true
result.value #=> {:message=>"hey Bob, things went wrong."}

You can also use ClassNames as commands and to organize them into other files. If #call is defined and no other commands are defined via command or commands then SimpleService will automatically use #call as the default command

require 'rubygems'
require 'simple_service'

class CommandOne
  include SimpleService

  def call(one:, two:)
    if one == 1 && two == 2
      success(three: one + two)
    else
      failure(something: 'went wrong')
    end
  end
end

class CommandTwo
  include SimpleService

  def call(three:)
    if three == 3
      success(seven: three + 4)
    else
      failure(another_thing: 'went wrong')
    end
  end
end

class DoNestedStuff
  include SimpleService

  commands CommandOne, CommandTwo
end

result = DoNestedStuff.call(one: 1, two: 2)
result.success? #=> true
result.value #=> {:seven=>7}

result = DoNestedStuff.call(one: 2, two: 1)
result.success? #=> false
result.value #=> {something: 'went wrong'}

If you would like your service to process an enumerable you can override .call on your service object. Invoking #super in your definition and passing along the appropriate arguments will allow your command chain to proceed as normal, but called multiple times via a loop. The Result object returned from each call to #super can be passed in as an argument to the next iteration or you can collect the result objects yourself and then do any post processing required.

require 'rubygems'
require 'simple_service'

class LoopingService
  include SimpleService

  commands :add_one

  def self.call(count:)
    count = kwargs

    # In this example the result object from super overwrites 
    # the previous result/initial args. You could also capture 
    # results in an array or hash for further manipulation.
    # If you do not need to do anything with the result object
    # then there is no need to assign it back to anything. 
    3.times do
      count = super(count)
    end

    count
  end

  def add_one(count:)
    success(count: count + 1)
  end
end

result = LoopingService.call(count: 0) 
result.is_a?(SimpleService::Result) #=> true
result.value #=> {count: 3}

If you are using this with a Rails app, placing top level services in app/services/ and all nested commands in app/services/commands/ is recommended. Even if not using rails, a similar structure also works well.

Contributing

  1. Fork it
  2. Create your feature branch (git checkout -b my-new-feature)
  3. Commit your changes (git commit -am 'Add some feature')
  4. Push to the branch (git push origin my-new-feature)
  5. Create new Pull Request