Project

swaggard

0.08
Low commit activity in last 3 years
There's a lot of open issues
A long-lived project that still receives updates
Generate swagger documentation for your Rails REST API using YARD
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016
2017
2018
2019
2020
2021
2022
 Dependencies

Development

Runtime

>= 4.0, < 7.0
>= 0
 Project Readme

Swaggard

Swaggard is a Rails Engine that can be used to document a REST api. It does this by generating a json that is compliant with Swagger and displaying it using Swagger-ui. This gem is inspired and based on SwaggerYard by Chris Trinh.

Compatibility

This table tracks the version of Swagger UI used on each Swaggard version and the supported rails version.

Swaggard Version Swagger UI Version Supported Rails Versions
1.1.x 2.2.8 4 - 6
1.0.x 2.2.8 4 - 5
0.5.x 2.2.8 4 - 5
0.4.x 2.2.8 4
0.3.x 2.1.3 4
0.2.x 2.1.3 4
0.1.x 2.1.3 4
0.0.x 2.1.8-M1 4

Installation

Put Swaggard in your Gemfile:

gem 'swaggard'

Install the gem with Bundler:

bundle install

Getting Started

First generate a Swaggard configuration initializer file.

rails g swaggard:install

This will install the file swaggard.rb to your Rails config/initializers directory which you can then alter the config.

Mount your engine

# config/routes.rb

mount Swaggard::Engine, at: '/api_docs/swagger/'

Make sure the asset pipeline is enabled by either requiring all railties or just the sprockets one:

# config/application.rb

require 'sprockets/railtie'

Access your service documentation

open http://localhost:3000/api_docs/swagger/

Access the raw swagger json

open http://localhost:3000/api_docs/swagger.json

Example

By just using Swaggard you'll get documentation for the endpoints that exist on your service: http method, path, path params. And grouping will be done based on the controller that holds each path.

This is fine base but you should add more documentation in order to provide more information of the expected inputs and outputs or even change the grouping of the endpoints.

Here is a example of how to use Swaggard

# config/routes.rb

resources :users, only: [] do
  resources :posts, controller: 'users/posts', only: [:index, :create]
end


# app/controllers/users/posts_controller.rb

# @tag UsersPosts
# API for creating, deleting, and listing user posts.
class Users::PostsController < ActionController::Base

  # Returns the list of user posts
  #
  # @response_status 201
  # @response_root posts
  # @response_class Array<PostSerializer>
  def index
    ...
  end

  # Create user post
  #
  # @body_parameter [string] title
  # @body_parameter [string] body
  # @body_parameter [string] topic_id
  #
  # @response_class PostSerializer
  def create
    ...
  end

end


# app/serializers/post_serializer.rb

# @attr [integer] id
# @attr [string] title
# @attr [string] body
# @attr [date-time] created_at
# @attr [date-time] updated_at
# @attr [TopicSerializer] topic
class PostSerializer < ActiveModel::Serializer

  attribute :id
  attribute :title
  attribute :body
  attribute :created_at
  attribute :updated_at

  has_one :topic, serializer: TopicSerializer

end


# app/serializers/topic_serializer.rb

# @attr [integer] id
# @attr [string] name
# @attr [date-time] created_at
# @attr [date-time] updated_at
class TopicSerializer < ActiveModel::Serializer

  attribute :id
  attribute :name
  attribute :created_at
  attribute :updated_at

end

Will generate

Web UI

Available tags

Controllers

  • @tag name This is used to indicate under what name tag this controller needs to be grouped. If not provided it will use the full controller class name.
  • @query_parameter [type] name This is used to indicate that your action receives the name parameter of type on the query string.
  • @body_parameter [type] name This is used to indicate that your action receives the name parameter of type on the body.
  • @response_class type This is used to indicate that your action returns a response of type.
  • @response_status 200 This is used to indicate the response code of your action when everything goes well.
  • @response_root name This is used to indicate that your action returns its response inside a root key element name. If not provided the root is omitted and the response its returned directly.
  • @form_parameter
  • @parameter_list

Models

  • @attr [type] name This is used to indicate that your models has an attribute name of type.

Primitives

When one of these types is given Swaggard will handle them directly instead of searching for a definition:

  • integer
  • long
  • float
  • double
  • string
  • byte
  • binary
  • boolean
  • date
  • date-time
  • password
  • hash

Authentication

Swaggard supports two types of authentication: header and query.

You can configure it as follows:

# config/initializers/swaggard.rb
Swaggard.configure do |config|
  config.authentication_type  = 'header' # Defaults to 'query'
  config.authentication_key   = 'X-AUTH-TOKEN' # Defaults to 'api_key'
  config.authentication_value = 'your-secret-key' # Initial value for authentication. Defaults to ''
end

Even if you provide a authentication_value you can later change it from the ui.

Access authorization

Swaggard supports access authorization.

You can configure it as follows:

# config/initializers/swaggard.rb
Swaggard.configure do |config|
  config.access_username  = 'admin'
  config.access_password   = 'password'
end

If you not set access_username, everyone will have access to Swagger documentation.

Additional parameters

Swaggard supports additional parameters to be sent on every request, either as a header or as part of the query.

You can configure it as follows:

# config/initializers/swaggard.rb
Swaggard.configure do |config|
  config.additional_parameters = [{ key: 'TOKEN', type: 'header', value: '234' }]
end

type can be 'header' or 'query'. If value is provided then it will be used as a default. You can change/set the value for the parameters in the ui.

Default content type

You can set default content type in Swaggard configuration as follows:

# config/initializers/swaggard.rb
Swaggard.configure do |config|
  config.default_content_type = 'application/json'
end

If you set default_content_type, Swagger will use it in example request.

Language

You can set the language for SwaggerUI as follows:

# config/initializers/swaggard.rb
Swaggard.configure do |config|
  config.language = 'es'
end

The default value is: 'en'. Supported values are:

  • ca
  • el
  • en
  • es
  • fr
  • geo
  • it
  • ja
  • ko-kr
  • pl
  • pt
  • ru
  • tr
  • zh-cn

Caching

You can improve Swagger performance by using caching. You can enable use_cache in Swaggard configuration as follows:

# config/initializers/swaggard.rb
Swaggard.configure do |config|
  config.use_cache = Rails.env.production?
end

If you set use_cache as Rails.env.production?, Swagger will use cache only in production mode.

Note. For cache clearing you can execute rake swaggard:clear_cache.

Documentation Scoping

Its possible to only generate Swagger documentation for a subset of your application controllers to do this you just need to use the controllers_path config option. For instance to only generate documentation for the controllers under app/controllers/api you need do this:

# config/initializers/swaggard.rb
Swaggard.configure do |config|
  ...
  config.controllers_path = "#{Rails.root}/app/controllers/api/**/*.rb"
  ...
end

The default value for controllers_path is "#{Rails.root}/app/controllers/**/*.rb".

More Information

Author

Adrian Gomez

Credits

Chris Trinh author of SwaggerYard in which this gem is inspired and used a base.