Project

whereable

0.0
The project is in a healthy, maintained state
Translates where-like filter syntax into an Arel-based ActiveRecord scope, so you can safely use SQL syntax in Rails controller parameters. What it lacks in power, it gains in simplicity and ease of use for API consumers.
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 Project Readme

Gem Version

Whereable

Translates where-like filter syntax into an Arel-based ActiveRecord scope, so you can safely use SQL syntax in Rails controller parameters. What it lacks in power, it gains in simplicity and ease of use for API consumers.

Installation

Add this line to your application's Gemfile:

gem 'whereable'

And then execute:

$ bundle install

Or install it yourself as:

$ gem install whereable

Usage

Imagine a User model:

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  include Whereable

  validates :username, presence: true, uniqueness: true

  validates :born_on, presence: true

  enum role: { standard: 0, admin: 1 }
end

With this data:

User.create!(username: 'Morpheus', role: :admin, born_on: '1961-07-30')
User.create!(username: 'Neo', role: :standard, born_on: '1964-09-02')
User.create!(username: 'Trinity', role: :standard, born_on: '1967-08-21')

Let's assume you're allowing filtered API access to your Users, but using the #standard scope to keep admins hidden. So your controller might include:

User.standard.where(params[:filter])

And your white hat API consumers pass in filter=born_on < '1967-01-01', and …

User.standard.where("born_on < '1967-01-01'")

returns Neo as expected, so we're all good.

Meanwhile… Your black hat API consumer passes in filter=true) or (true, and …

User.standard.where("true) or (true")

returns EVERYONE, because the database query is …

SELECT "users".* FROM "users" WHERE "users"."role" = 0 AND (true) or (true)

This is how the Matrix gets hacked.

Instead add include Whereable to your model, and change your controller to:

User.standard.whereable(params[:filter])

And then …

User.standard.whereable("born_on < '1967-01-01'")

returns Neo as before, but …

User.standard.whereable("true) or (true")

raises exception …

Whereable::FilterInvalid ('Invalid filter at ) or (true')

Syntax

  • Supports and/or with nested parentheses as needed
  • Recognizes these operators: eq ne gte gt lte lt = != <> >= > <= <, plus IN and BETWEEN
  • Column must be to left of operator, and literal(s) to right
    • Comparing columns to each other is not supported
    • BETWEEN requires two literals separated by AND
      • Example: publish_at between '2020-11-01 12:00 EST' and '2020-11-15 23:59:59 EST'
    • IN requires comma-separated literals in parentheses
      • Example: username in (Morpheus, Trinity)
  • Quotes are optional unless the literal contains spaces or quotes
    • Supports double or single quotes, and embedded quotes may be backslash escaped
    • Also supports the PostgreSQL double-single embedded quote
  • Enum literals must use the name, not the database value:
    • 👍 User.whereable('role = admin')
    • 👎 User.whereable('role = 1')

More

See the Wiki for more.

Development

After checking out the repo, run bin/setup to install dependencies. Then, run rake spec to run the tests. You can also run bin/console for an interactive prompt that will allow you to experiment.

To install this gem onto your local machine, run bundle exec rake install. To release a new version, update the version number in version.rb, and then run bundle exec rake release, which will create a git tag for the version, push git commits and tags, and push the .gem file to rubygems.org.

Contributing

Bug reports and pull requests are welcome on GitHub at https://github.com/MacksMind/whereable.

License

The gem is available as open source under the terms of the MIT License.