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An awesome admin solution for Rails
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 Project Readme

HyperAdmin

HyperAdmin is an admin interface solution for Ruby on Rails. It works pretty much as a mountable engine, except it always mounts under /admin. This is currently not configurable.

Installation

Simply put the gem in your Rails application's Gemfile:

gem 'hyper_admin'

Then, install the bundle as usual:

$ bundle install

Finally, mount HyperAdmin into your application. Put this in your config/routes.rb file:

HyperAdmin.routes self
mount HyperAdmin::Engine, at: '/admin'

As mentioned above, you must mount it under /admin for the time being. In a later version, this will be configurable.

Usage

To register models that should be accessible through the admin, all you need to do is register them with a single line of code. Do this in any Ruby file(s) you want under app/admin/, such as app/admin/article.rb or app/admin/person.rb. When the application boots, HyperAdmin will check each file under the app/admin/. To register a resource:

HyperAdmin.register NameOfYourResource

For instance:

HyperAdmin.register Article

With this in place, you can now visit /admin/articles in your application and start managing your articles.

Configuring views

When registering resources, it is also possible to customize what fields should show up where and (to some degree) how they should be displayed. For instance, we might want to only show the ID, title and publication date of an article in the index view. For that, we would pass in a block to register and specify which columns to display on the index view, like this:

HyperAdmin.register Article do
  index do
    column :id
    column :title
    column :published_at
  end
end

Note that the order matters here, so this could also be used to force an order of attributes to be displayed. In the example above, HyperAdmin would know the types of the attributes because of how it is registered in the database. However, some types cannot be determined from the database alone. URL fields and e-mail fields, for instance, are stored as text, so they will be treated as text by default. It is possible to tell HyperAdmin what type of field you're specifying by using the type keyword:

HyperAdmin.register Article do
  index do
    column :id
    column :title
    column :published_at
    column :author_email, type: :email
  end
end

The “email” type will create a “mailto”-style link in the index and show views, and an <input type="email"> in the form. Likewise, the “url” type will create a regular link in index/show and an <input type="url"> in forms.

Lastly, it is also possible to customize the labeling of the attributes in each view using the human keyword:

HyperAdmin.register Article do
  index do
    column :id
    column :title
    column :published_at, human: "Publication date"
    column :author_email, type: :email
  end
end

Note that if human is not specified, HyperAdmin will fetch the attribute name from the currently active locale, which is recommended most of the time. human is available for special cases where you want a label other than the localized name of the attribute.

Customizing the show and form pages work the same way as the index pages, but using the row and field methods instead, respectively. A fully customized resource registration might look something like this:

HyperAdmin.register Article do
  index do
    column :id
    column :title
    column :published_at, human: "Publication date"
  end

  show do
    row :id, human: "Article ID"
    row :title
    row :body
    row :published_at, human: "Publication date"

    column :author_email, type: :email
  end

  form do
    field :title
    field :body
    field :published_at
    field :author_email, type: :email
  end
end

Contributing

  1. Fork it
  2. Check out the develop branch (git checkout develop)
  3. Create your feature branch (git checkout -b feature/my-new-feature)
  4. Commit your changes (git commit -am 'Add my new feature')
  5. Push to the branch (git push origin my-new-feature)
  6. Create a new Pull Request

Credits

Hyper made this. We're a digital communications agency with a passion for good code, and if you're using HyperAdmin we probably want to hire you.

License

HyperAdmin is available under the MIT license. See LICENSE.md for more details.