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"Pokemoves allows you to easily check which moves pokemon can learn, as well as which pokemon can learn a specific move. You can also check a move's given type."
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FlexCoerce - is a gem which allow you create operator-dependent coercion logic. It's useful when your type should be treated in a different way for different binary operations (including arithmetic operators, bitwise operators and comparison operators except equality checks: `==`, `===`).
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There's a lot of open issues
Typedeaf is a gem to help add some type-checking to method declarations in Ruby
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This gem with asks user input for there state name, then will prompt the use to type there city they would like to check the daily weather of."
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Flags is a framework for Ruby which allows the definition of command-line flags, which are parsed in and can be accessed smartly from within your Ruby code. This framework allows for numerous different flag types, and takes care of the process of type conversion and flag validation (type and value checking).
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Methods for defining type-checked arrays and attributes
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Contains validators for date and time values, type checking.
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This gem with asks user input for there state name, then will prompt the use to type there city they would like to check the daily weather of.
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Allows checking of reply content type with request accept types. Also allows contracting of downstream apps to supplying a single type.
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Provides several utilities for run-time type-checking with Ruby
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# EventReporter EventReporter is a CSV parser and sorter. you can load a CSV and then search it. ## Installation $ gem install the_only_event_reporter_ever $ gem list event_reporter -d ## Usage After installation run: $ event_reporter Then Type 'load <filename>' to load records from a CSV $ Load event_attendees.csv Try these commands $ Find first_name sarah $Queue Print $Queue Save to <filename> ### Saving the queue accepts extensions JSON, XML, TXT, CSV. ## Contributing 1. Fork it 2. Create your feature branch (`git checkout -b my-new-feature`) 3. Commit your changes (`git commit -am 'Add some feature'`) 4. Push to the branch (`git push origin my-new-feature`) 5. Create new Pull Request
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Objective-C style named parameters and type checking for Ruby.
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Gem helps to do next things with your objects - check the type, make a conversions and work with hashes
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# Fresh::Auth This gem makes it really, REALLY easy to use the Freshbooks API. It couldn't be easier. With only 3 functions you'll ever need to use, and only 2 required configuration values, it can't get any easier. ## Installation Add this line to your application's Gemfile: gem 'fresh-auth' And then execute: $ bundle Or install it yourself as: $ gem install fresh-auth ## Usage ### Configuration: You must define your Freshbooks subdomain and your OAuth Secret in your application code before using Fresh::Auth. For Ruby on Rails apps, a new file at config/initializers/fresh-auth.rb would be appropriate. Your configuration file should look like this (you fill in the three empty strings): Fresh::Auth.configure do |config| # The part of your login url between 'http://' and '.freshbooks.com' config.url.subdomain = "" # Under 'My Account' (on the top right when you're logged into Freshbooks) # -> 'Freshbooks API' -> 'OAuth Developer Access' -> 'OAuth Secret' # You'll need to request this from Freshbooks initially. config.oauth_secret = "" # Optional. Any string of your choice. Be creative or check out http://www.thebitmill.com/tools/password.html config.nonce_salt = "" end Fear not: If you try to use Fresh::Auth without configuring it first, an exception will be thrown that clearly describes the problem. ### Public API: There are two modules in this API: Fresh::Auth::Authentication and Fresh::Auth::Api #### Fresh::Auth::Authentication This module authenticates you with Freshbooks, storing the authentication in an array called `session`. This integrates seamlessly with Ruby on Rails' controller environment. If you're using some framework other than Ruby on Rails, make sure to define session in your class before including the Authentication module. This isn't recommended because your class will also need to define other objects called `params` and `request` and implement a `redirect_to` method. It gets complicated. Better leave it to Rails to handle this for you. The only public function of this module is AuthenticateWithFreshbooks. To use it, just add the following line of code to your controller: ` include Fresh::Auth::Authentication ` Then, the following line of code authenticates with Freshbooks from any method in your controller: ` AuthenticateWithFreshbooks() ` Note that, after authenticating with Freshbooks, the user will be redirected back to the same path using HTTP GET, so make sure the resource supports HTTP GET and that in the business logic executed on GET, AuthenticateWihFreshbooks() is called. #### Fresh::Auth::Api Once you've authenticated, you want to send XML requests to Freshbooks. The first step is preparing the XML with Fresh::Auth::Api.GenerateXml, which you'll supply with a block that defines all the nested XML that you want in your request. GenerateXml also takes two arguments before the block: the class and method that you want to call. First, in your controller: `include Fresh::Auth::Api` Then, in some method in that controller: my_xml = GenerateXml :invoice, :update do |xml| xml.client_id 20 xml.status 'sent' xml.notes 'Pick up the car by 5' xml.terms 'Cash only' xml.lines { xml.line { xml.name 'catalytic converter' xml.quantity 1 xml.unit_cost 450 xml.type 'Item' } xml.line { xml.name 'labor' xml.quantity 1 xml.unit_cost 60 xml.type 'Time' } } end Ok, you created the XML. Now you want to send it. Sounds pretty complicated, right? Not at all! Ready? Let's go! `_response = PostToFreshbooksApi my_xml` Now, are you wondering what's in `_response`? I'll tell you shortly, but before we discuss that, we have to know about the exception that PostToFreshbooksApi might raise. It raises a detailed error message if the response status is not 'ok'. Makes sense, right? Now, you still want to know what's in `_response`? Oh, nothing fancy. Just a Nokogiri XML object, representing the root element of the xml response. Could this get any easier? ## Contributing 1. Fork it 2. Create your feature branch (`git checkout -b my-new-feature`) 3. Commit your changes (`git commit -am 'Added some feature'`) 4. Push to the branch (`git push origin my-new-feature`) 5. Create new Pull Request
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A collection of diverse simple utilities without much anything to do with one another. The main rationale is to reduce the time spent on boilerplate like checking whether the arguments have the right type, or introducing some basic internationalization. More detail in the README.
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